Course Information

 

for Mundelein Seminary Department


Pauline or Synoptic Gospel (BH500)

Credits:2

Biblical Hebrew I (BH505)

Credits:3

Biblical Hebrew II (BH506)

Credits:3

The Book of Hebrews (BH508)

Credits:2

Hebrew I (BH509)

Credits:2

Prophets (BH510)

Credits:3

Wisdom/Psalms (BH511)

Credits:3

Johannine Literature (BH512)

Credits:3

The course will be devoted to the study of the Gospel of John, 1—3 John, and Revelation. Clement of Alexandria called John’s Gospel a “Spiritual Gospel,” noting its greater emphasis on Jesus’ heavenly origins than his earthly roots as found already in the other three gospels (e.g., in the genealogies of Matthew and Luke). John’s Gospel, with its poetic, narrative, and symbolic cohesion, has a more distinguishing style than the other gospels, intended to communicate the experience of encountering Christ. We will be emphasizing the impact the telling of the story has on readers and listeners, transforming their reception of the tradition into an encounter with the Lord.

Pauline Literature (BH513)

Credits:3

The main goal of the course is to improve our ability to read and to understand Paul’s letters so that the Word will shape us into better disciples and preachers of the gospel. The Lord set this agenda when he told the lawyer regarding the Torah (= Bible): “In the law what is written? How do you understand it? (Luke 10:26). Here Jesus sets out the two key questions for us as we read and pray not only Paul but the whole Bible: First, what does the passage say (what is written)? What would it have meant to its original hearers / readers? Second, what does the passage mean now, to us (how do you understand it)? Beyond understanding the passage, what will we do about it? Since this is the first Scripture Course in the Major Seminary for most students in First Theology, we will consider some introductory questions along the way. With regard to studying Paul, these would include Paul’s use of the letter form, Paul’s idea of justification by faith, the nature and importance of Paul’s experience on the road to Damascus, and Paul as a pastoral theologian. To these ends we will highlight Paul’s strategies as a pastor in six of the “authentic” letters: Philemon, 1 Thessalonians, Galatians, Philippians, Romans, and 1 Corinthians(as we have time). We will also consider one of the “deutero-Pauline” letters (Colossians).

Homiletics II (BH514)

Credits:3

The goal of Homiletics I is helping seminarians develop the habit of preaching. The objective is to prepare for the diaconate and beyond, for a pastoral ministry that involves regular Sunday preaching. We will consider the specific nature of a homily, study the pastoral use of the lectionary, and learn a methodology that can be used weekly. The class will be conducted for the most part as an apprentice workshop (practice preaching, video recording, and class feedback) to develop skills of listening that allow the preacher to hear himself as the congregation hears him.

Narrative Preaching (BH515)

Credits:3

The second required Homiletics course will be team-taught. The instructors will separately explain and demonstrate a single method to prepare a homily, and the students will practice the specific skills. The purpose is to teach a few helpful strategies to regular preachers for moving from the lectionary to the homily. The goal is to be fascinated by the stories in the Bible and to discover levels of meaning in images: to want to preach.

Intro to Bible Psalms and Wisdom (BH516)

Credits:3

Prophets (BH517)

Credits:3

This course provides an overview of the classical biblical prophets. It pays particular attention to the prophet’s call to be God’s messengers, to their unique contributions to divine revelation, and to the distinctive and haunting style that they employ to engage their contemporaries and to persuade them to adapt their personal views and priorities to those of their covenant God.

Synoptic Gospels and Acts (BH518)

Credits:3

Homiletics I (BH519)

Credits:3

Synoptic Gospels and Acts (BH520)

Credits:3

The Gospels of Mark, Matthew and Luke, three of the principal witnesses of “the life and teaching of the incarnate Word and Savior, Jesus,” reveal the work of the Spirit within the richness and diversity of the first apostles and their communities, that spread the Good News. Luke’s second book, Acts, testifies how salvation was handed on by the Church, a task that continues to our days.

Hebrew II (BH521)

Credits:2

Pentateuch & Histories (BH530)

Credits:3

This course will examine the so-called "historical books" of the Old Testament, namely, the Pentateuch, the Deuteronomic History and the works attributed to the Chronicler. The study of these books will be from the point of view of the history, faith and culture of ancient Israel. The principles used for the exegesis of these texts are those presented in Divina Afflante Spiritu and The Interpretation of the Bible in the Church. Students are expected to be familiar with these documents.

Johannine Literature (BH535)

Credits:3

Face of the Lord (BH540)

Credits:2

Laudato Si & The Poor (BH618)

Credits:2

Theology in the Psalter (BH620)

Credits:2

This class is a study of Hebrew poetic genres as contained in the Book of Psalms. Emphasis is on reading the Psalms in their historical and literary settings. Christian usage of the Psalms in the Liturgy is also examined.

Book of Job (BH621)

Credits:2

Book of Genesis (BH622)

Credits:2

We will study the Book of Genesis in its entirety, employing a canonical reading of the text. We will engage the text from three perspectives: a penetrating insight into the complexity of the human person; a challenging revelation of the workings of God throughout all creation; and a transformative proclamation of God’s desire to bring all humanity into perfect union with him.

Psalms (BH623)

Credits:2

Rdg Scripture w/Fathers (BH625)

Credits:2

New Testament Greek for Theologians I (BH626)

Credits:2

The Psalms: Theology, Composition, and Spirituality (BH627)

Credits:2

New Testament Greek for Theologians II (BH628)

Credits:2

Systemic Biblical Theology (BH629)

Credits:2

Word of God & Liturgy (BH630)

Credits:2

Homiletics II (BH631)

Credits:2

Book of Jeremiah (BH632)

Credits:2

Book of Revelation (BH633)

Credits:2

Word of God & Liturgy (BH635)

Credits:2

Gospel of Year (BH637)

Credits:2

Theol. Resources for Preaching (BH654)

Credits:2

Pauline (Preaching on Paul) (BH656)

Credits:2

During Ordinary Time, the second reading is usually from Paul; however, for various reasons, preachers seldom include the Pauline readings when they proclaim the Word. We will try to remedy this situation by creating homilies that emphasize the Pauline reading. By reading and studying three major letters of Paul—Romans and 1 & 2 Corinthians—we will not only practice preaching on Paul, but also gain insight into how to preach like Paul. Paul and the other apostles were not only “new” evangelists: they were among the first evangelists. Paul’s letters show that as a preacher he had the seven qualities Fr. Barron says “new evangelists” should have (including being in love with the new media).

Gospel of Year (BH657)

Credits:2

This is a course in Homiletics. It will involve members in a homily preparation group, and will try to assist individual preachers in developing their own method of moving from the Scriptures to the homily. Most Catholics hear the Word of God “in church.” What does the structure of the lectionary tell us about the nature of the Scripture and how we read through the Church, in the Church, with the Church.

Gospel of Mark (BH660)

Credits:2

The Gospel of Mark was the first to be composed, and, in this sense, Mark was the “first” evangelist. In this course we will do a close reading of the entire gospel, especially attending to the believing interpreter’s questions: What did it mean then? What does it mean now? The touchstone or medium for our reading will be the community of believers which the first evangelist addressed. We believers today face analogous challenges to and benefits from the same faith.

Exodus (BH661)

Credits:2

Romans 1 & 2 Corinthians (BH675)

Credits:2

Gospel of Matthew (BH680)

Credits:3

Scripture, Liturgy & New Evang. (BH682)

Credits:3

Outside Course (BI399)

Credits:3

Vietnam Church History (CH500)

Credits:2

Formation of Catholic Tradition (CH511)

Credits:3

The Catholic Church draws her Rule of Faith from Scripture and Tradition. The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a detailed introduction to the first six centuries of Christian life and thought---the centuries that first formulated our Rule of Faith and set the agenda for all subsequent Catholic theology.

Formation of Catholic Tradition (CH512)

Credits:2

Medieval Church History (CH515)

Credits:3

This course will examine primarily the development of the Church in the West from A.D. 600 to 1400. The main theme of the course will be to examine how the faith was expressed and incorporated into medieval society and how that synthesis began to unravel just before the dawn of the early modern period. Topics include the development of the papacy, formation of the Papal States, the Crusades, imperial and papal tensions, the development and impact of religious movements and orders, intellectual movements, and reform.

Reformation and Revolution (CH516)

Credits:2

This course will survey the history of the church from 1500-1850. Particular emphasis will be placed on the responses of the Church to the challenges of the Protestants, the Nation-States, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution. The course will also discuss the global expansion of the Church in her missions. Other topics include: the development of the papacy, the role and impact of religious orders, reform, and intellectual and educational developments.

Modern Church History (CH517)

Credits:2

This course covers papal history from Pope Pius IX through St. Pope John Paul II. The rise of nationalism, especially in Italy, Germany and France, resulted in new models of church/state relations. During the 20th century, the papacy faced the challenges of totalitarian governments – Communism, Fascism, and National Socialism. The papacy evolved in significant ways during these decades to address the challenges of the modern world. This course will examine the nature of church/state relations, the development of Catholic identity, the teaching authority of the papacy, and the renewal of intellectual and religious life in the Catholic Church during from the 19th to the early 21st century.

American Church History (CH518)

Credits:2

Ugandan Church History (CH521)

Credits:2

Reformation (CH600)

Credits:0

American Catholic History (CH602)

Credits:2

American Religious History (CH603)

Credits:2

Fathers & Mothers of the Desert (CH616)

Credits:2

This course will examine the rise of Christian monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will consider the historical context of monasticism, examine its theological content primarily through contemporary writings, and assess its impact on the Church’s life and spirituality.

Rdgs Scriptures with the Fathers (CH625)

Credits:2

20th Century Catholic Theology (CH636)

Credits:3

Special Topics in Christian Life & Thought (CH637)

Credits:2

This course will allow a student to study in depth one particular topic from either the History or Theology of the Christian Tradition. Under the guidance of the professor the student will be directed to the most important facets of scholarship concerning the topic and will produce a researched response to that scholarship. The course allows for both a deeper investigation of a single topic, but also provides training in research and methodology.

Narrators of Christian History (CH638)

Credits:2

This course is designed to investigate the missionary activities of the Early Medieval Church from ca. A.D. 450 to 900. The course will not only describe the events in the conversion process during these centuries, but will also explore the larger methodological considerations that faced the early medieval missionaries. Central to the course will be an emphasis on how the student may use examples from the past to inspire and direct future ministry.

Methods of Early Medieval Evangel. (CH639)

Credits:2

Spec Topics - American Church History (CH640)

Credits:2

Contemp. American Catholicism (CH645)

Credits:2

This reading and discussion course will examine some of the topics and issues that the Catholic Church in the United States has faced since the end of the Second Vatican Council. The purpose of this course is to understand the various pastoral, social, and theological issues facing the Catholic Church in the United States in the third millennium. The historical roots of these issues, as well as, a comparison with similar issues from earlier periods of American Catholic history will be studied.

American Catholic &Political Life (CH646)

Credits:2

Although the United States has the principle of separation of Church and state, American Catholics have always been involved in the political life of the nation. This course examines some of the pertinent church/state questions from the Civil War to Vatican II. Topics discussed include public education, the American Protective Association, the Spanish American War, the German question during World War I, the presidential campaign of Al Smith, Reverend Charles Coughlin, Catholics and McCarthy, and the 1960’s civil rights movement.

American Catholic Social Issues (CH675)

Credits:2

Church History (CH680)

Credits:2

Catholic and American Political LIfe (CH690)

Credits:3

American Catholics - War & Peace (CH691)

Credits:3

Catholics and Social Issues (CH695)

Credits:2

Ecclesiology & Mariology (DT500)

Credits:2

Christology & Liturgy (DT501)

Credits:2

Doctrine of Priesthood (DT502)

Credits:1

Sacraments of Healing & Vocation (DT505)

Credits:3

Christology (DT510)

Credits:1

Fundamental Theology (DT511)

Credits:3

The course examines the foundations of faith and theology. It considers the religious nature of humankind, theories of revelation and faith, the development of the Christian tradition and its role in Christian life, the inspiration of scripture, and the relationship of Christianity to other religions.

Christology & Soteriology (DT513)

Credits:3

This course is a general introduction to the theology of the person and work of Jesus Christ. The first part of the course surveys the development of dogma of the person of Christ from Jesus' teaching about himself to the Third Council of Constantinople. The second part of the course examines the contemporary challenge of historical-critical investigation of Scripture to the identity and saving mission of Christ and the Scriptural foundations for the doctrine of Christ as universal savior. The third part of the course surveys the development of understanding of the saving work of Christ, emphasizing the Roman Catholic understanding of the dynamics of salvation in comparison with Eastern, Protestant and contemporary pluralist soteriologies.

Doctrine of God, One & Three (DT514)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to study the Christian understanding of God as it has been articulated by some of the great theological figures of our tradition. The first portion of the course will be an examination of the various arguments, classical and contemporary, concerning the existence of God as well as a review of arguments against God’s existence. It will also consider the attributes of God, primarily as formulated in scholastic theology. In the second portion of the course we will engage in an historical review concerning the development of Trinitarian theology and doctrine and include issues raised by modern theologians concerning Trinitarian doctrine.

Anthropology, Creation, Grace (DT515)

Credits:3

This course will treat the Christian understanding of the origin and destiny of the universe and humanity. Encompassing the major themes of creation, the human person, sin, grace and eschatology, we will carefully consider topics such as the image of God, freedom, the doctrine of Original Sin, the theology of grace, justification and merit, death, judgment, heaven, hell, and purgatory.

Principles of Sacraments/Sacraments of Initiation (DT517)

Credits:3

Sacraments of Healing & Vocation (DT518)

Credits:3

This course is the second of two required classes in the branch of dogmatic theology known as sacramental theology. The course will commence with a brief review of the general sacramental doctrine of the Church. We will then proceed to carefully examine the two Sacraments of Healing (Penance and Anointing of the Sick) and the two Sacraments at the Service of Communion (Holy Orders and Marriage). Each sacrament will be studied in its biblical, historical, canonical and liturgical aspects.

Capstone Assessment (DT519)

Credits:1

Ecclesiology (DT520)

Credits:3

Ecclesiology & Mariology (DT521)

Credits:2

Ecumenical & Interreligious Dialogue (DT522)

Credits:2

Ecclesiology & Mariology (DT523)

Credits:3

This course will analyze the origin, nature and mission of the Church. We will consider the four marks of the Church: one, holy Catholic and apostolic. We will consider pastoral, practical and theoretical questions which arise in discussing the mystery of the Church as People of God and Body of Christ and how we may discuss the Church in relation to ecclesial communities and other religions. The conciliar documents of the Second Vatican Council Lumen Gentium and Gaudium et Spes will be analyzed throughout the course. Finally, Chapter VIII of Lumen Gentium will be offered as a guide to the Church’s rich Marian doctrine and devotion.

Theology of Diocesan Priesthood (DT524)

Credits:3

Christology (DT525)

Credits:2

Anthropology (DT530)

Credits:2

Doctrine of God (DT535)

Credits:3

Theological Insights of Tiv Culture (DT536)

Credits:3

This course deals with culturally contextualized theology of the Tiv people of Benue State Nigeria. It will examine the relationship between culture and theology and how local customs and traditions form local theologies by focusing on the interrelationship between theology and social context. It will demonstrate how Tiv culture helps in the understanding of Catholic faith and theology.

Eucharistic Theology (DT540)

Credits:2

Pauline Christology (DT541)

Credits:4

Pneumatology: Experience of the Holy Spirit (DT604)

Credits:2

Pneumatology is the scientific-critical examination on the Church’s teaching on the Holy Spirit and the Spirit’s abiding presence in the Catholic Church. This course examines the biblical basis of, the Patristic and historical background to, and the past and present controversial issues in this often neglected, but critically important area of dogmatic theology, Orthodox and Protestant positions will be discussed. All this serves as a prelude to a systematic presentation of Pneumatology.

Soteriology (DT609)

Credits:2

Fathers & Mothers of the Desert (DT616)

Credits:2

This course will examine the rise of Christian monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will consider the historical context of monasticism, examine its theological content primarily through contemporary writings, and assess its impact on the Church’s life and spirituality.

St Augustine's City of God (DT618)

Credits:2

Chrstgy & Liturg. Teachings-Ratzinger (DT620)

Credits:2

Priesthood & Ministry (DT622)

Credits:2

Systemic Biblical Theology (DT623)

Credits:2

Rdg Scripture w/Fathers (DT625)

Credits:0

NCTI Global Theologies (DT628)

Credits:3

NCTI Global Theologies (DT629)

Credits:2

Globalization has produced an increased encounter between different cultures and religions.  These encounters have brought new questions to theology which never before have been asked.  The questions challenge Christian theologians to think anew about the basic doctrines of the faith.  The Fall NCTI seminar will explore some of the dimensions of theology that have been opened by globalization, such as “Christology: Christ as Healer and Ancestor in Africa,” “Anthropology: Human Identity in Shame-Based Cultures of the Far East,” and “Pneumatology: The Holy Spirit in Latin American Pentecostalism.” 

Global Issues in Systematic Theology (DT630)

Credits:2

Systematic Biblical Theology (DT631)

Credits:2

The Experience of Triune God:The Theology of Fr. Dumitru Staniloae (DT634)

Credits:3

The course examines the oeuvre of Romanian Orthodox theologian Fr. Dumtiru Staniloae (1903-93). The course will consider his writings - especially under the categories of dogmatic and systematic. It will bear out the liturgical and – albeit secondarily – philosophical bases for his theology. It will show how a theologian, grounded in a rich spirituality and patristic tradition, is able to navigate between various temptations – fascism, communism and materialism in his time – and provide the Church with a living testimony (he had been imprisoned by communism) and thereby with profound systematic presentation of the Christian faith.

TR on the New Evangelization (DT636)

Credits:3

What is the New Evangelization and how is it accomplished? This course will bring together magisterial and theological resources, socio-cultural analysis and pastoral theology to formulate a response to this question. Particular topics to be addressed include defining the New Evangelization, the challenges of the presentation of the gospel to consumer culture and to the millennial generation; understanding faith formation in relation to psychological and social development; pastoral strategies for teaching the gospel in the 21st century.

Spec. Topics in Christian Life & Thgt (DT637)

Credits:2

This course will allow a student to study in depth one particular topic from either the History or Theology of the Christian Tradition. Under the guidance of the professor the student will be directed to the most important facets of scholarship concerning the topic and will produce a researched response to that scholarship. The course allows for both a deeper investigation of a single topic, but also provides training in research and methodology.

Aquinas the Exegete & Preacher (DT642)

Credits:2

As a Dominican, a mendicant priest, and a medieval Magister in Sacra Pagina, Thomas Aquinas dedicated a significant amount of his life and ministry to interpreting the Word of God--both for university students in the classroom, as well as for wider congregations in the Liturgy. This course will acquaint students with Thomas the exegete and preacher by studying the content of his Biblical commentaries and sermons, as well as the method he followed as he moved from the sacra pagina to exegesis, and from exegesis to preaching. In the process, the picture of Thomas that emerges is the portrait of a saint and scholar who applied his knowledge to the prayerful study of the Word of God, and a priest and urban preacher who understood well the importance of Scripture study and dynamic preaching in the evangelization of society. The course will also pay particular attention to lessons that can be drawn from Thomas for preaching and evangelization today. 

Yves Congar's 20th Century Ecclesiology (DT643)

Credits:2

Congar and Newman: Reformation in the Church, how doctrine and structures may and may not change (DT645)

Credits:2

American Catholic and Political Life (DT646)

Credits:2

Eucharist as Sacrament & Sacrifice (DT648)

Credits:2

Theological Resources for Preaching (DT649)

Credits:2

Theological Resources for Preaching (DT650)

Credits:2

Soteriology (DT651)

Credits:3

Theological Resources for Preaching (DT654)

Credits:2

This course addresses particular issues in the theological content of preaching in light of the Second Vatican Council’s understanding of  preaching as the primary duty of priests and the primary instrument of formation and catechesis in parish life.  The goal of the course is to provide preachers with the tools to develop and evaluate the Biblical and theological content of the homily.  The course will be structured to provide significant opportunity for practice preaching and peer review.  Particular issues to be addressed include: the homily in the “new evangelization”; challenges in the effective use of the lectionary; presentation of the Christian worldview in the homily; options for structuring the homily; possibilities for evangelization in preaching outside the Sunday Mass.

Biblical Spirituality of Hans Von Balthasar (DT660)

Credits:3

Theology of Pope Benedict XVI (DT665)

Credits:3

In the person of Joseph Ratzinger a man has become Pope at the beginning of the 21st Century who had already shaped the Catholic Church in the second half of the 20th century more than any other single person, save John Paul II. As university professor he directed over fifty doctoral candidates, as scholar he authored over 250 titles, as peritus he contributed in central ways to the II. Vatican Council, as archbishop he pastored a major see, and as prefect of the CDF he gave Catholic faith in her dialogue with the world a distinctive theological profile. This course will examine the origins and the gravitational centers in Pope Benedict XVI Christology. It will explore his staurocentric view and its attendant ramifications on his understanding of the nature of the Church.

Human Person in the Thght of Edith Stein (DT668)

Credits:2

Mariology (DT669)

Credits:3

A multitude of theological vectors meet in the study of Mariology. Questions posed in disciplines such as Christology, Scripture, Tradition and anthropology are being intensified when confronted with the Christian understanding of Mary’s role in the life and works of Jesus Christ and the Church. The course investigates the biblical testimony to Mary, the Marian dogmas and attempts to confront these with liberation and feminist theology and intends to sensitize the student the ecumenical dimensions of Mariology.

Sp by Way of Autobio (HI405)

Credits:2

Newman & Vatican II (HI438)

Credits:2

Spriritual Path of Love (HI444)

Credits:3

Theology of St. Augustine (HI450)

Credits:3

Theology- St. Augustine (HI451)

Credits:3

Christology-T.Merton (HI459)

Credits:3

Francis & Bonaventure (HI464)

Credits:2

T.A. Intro Early Ch (HI509)

Credits:2

Reformation History (HI600)

Credits:2

Modern Church History (HI610)

Credits:2

Summer Language Intensive (HM214)

Credits:3

Outside Course (HM399)

Credits:2

Spanish Intensive (HM518)

Credits:0

Antugua Guatemala (HM520)

Credits:0

Theol. Research Comp. (LG000)

Credits:0

Theological Research and Composition is a basic course introducing students to theological reading, research, and writing.

Tutoring (LG030)

Credits:0

Theology Latin (LG505)

Credits:3

Liturgical Leadership (LM500)

Credits:1

Christology & Liturgy (LM501)

Credits:2

Principles of Sacred Liturgy (LM510)

Credits:3

Rooted in the Church’s documents on the liturgy, this course will treat the fundamental principles of Christian liturgy through an exploration of liturgical history and contemporary magisterial teaching on divine worship and liturgical music. The student will be provided with the theological, historical, pastoral and the practical understanding necessary to serve as future leaders of Catholic liturgical celebrations.

Liturgical Leadership (LM515)

Credits:1

The Deacon and the Liturgy (LM516)

Credits:3

This course provides a pastoral orientation of norms for the role of the deacon at celebrations of the Eucharist, Eucharistic Exposition and Benediction, Baptism, Marriage, Funeral Rites (Vigil and Committal), the Sacraments of Marriage and Baptism, the Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults, and other liturgical rites.

The Priest and the Liturgy (LM517)

Credits:3

This course provides a pastoral orientation to the role of the priest in the celebration of the Eucharist, selected sacraments, and other liturgical rites. Using the Roman Missal and Lectionary, and their accompanying official documentation, students are prepared to celebrate the Eucharist with pastoral competence and to lead the assembly in the worship of God. In addition, the musical role of the presider is discussed, and students are given the opportunity to practice singing presidential chants.

Liturg. Ministry in Hispanic Comm. (LM519)

Credits:1

To familiarize and prepare seminarians for celebrating the Sacraments of the Catholic Church as well as other sacraments and popular devotions of the Latino Catholic Community. This course will also reinforce and/or improve upon the seminarian’s basic language skills and cultural awareness.

Liturgical Leadership (LM520)

Credits:1

Liturgy: Principles & Practice (LM521)

Credits:3

Extraordinary Usage of the Latin Rite (LM525)

Credits:1

Mass Practicum (LM530)

Credits:2

The Liturgical Movement (LM554)

Credits:2

Choir (LM572)

Credits:1

Schola Choir (LM575)

Credits:1

Spanish Choir (LM576)

Credits:1

Vocal Practicum I (LM579)

Credits:1

American Accent Practicum (LM581)

Credits:0

Liturgy Christian Living (LM599)

Credits:3

Christology of Pope Benedict XVI (LM620)

Credits:3

Word of God & Liturgy (LM635)

Credits:2

Spec. Topics in Christian Life & Thgt (LM637)

Credits:2

This course will allow a student to study in depth one particular topic from either the History or Theology of the Christian Tradition. Under the guidance of the professor the student will be directed to the most important facets of scholarship concerning the topic and will produce a researched response to that scholarship. The course allows for both a deeper investigation of a single topic, but also provides training in research and methodology.

Theol. Resources for Preaching (LM654)

Credits:2

Master of Divinity Exam (MD500)

Credits:0

Canon Law II - I.S. (MO200)

Credits:3

Christian Principles (MO211)

Credits:3

Special Moral I (MO212)

Credits:3

Special Moral II (MO214)

Credits:3

Canon Law II (MO215)

Credits:3

Reconciliation Practicum (MO216)

Credits:3

Cardinal Virtues & Morality (MO300)

Credits:2

Catholic Sexual Morality (M-2) (MO305)

Credits:2

Splendor of Truth (MO309)

Credits:2

The Cardinal Virtues (MO30A)

Credits:2

Canonical Preparation for Marriage (MO30B)

Credits:2

Moral Decisions (MO312)

Credits:2

Medical Ethics (M-4) (MO314)

Credits:2

Fathers & Mothers (MO316)

Credits:3

Christian Marriage (M-3) (MO318)

Credits:3

Business Ethics(M-5) (MO319)

Credits:3

St. John of the Cross (MO321)

Credits:3

Moral Problems (M-5) (MO324)

Credits:3

Hist. Dev. Mor. Theo (M-1) (MO330)

Credits:3

Temporalities C.L-m5 (MO332)

Credits:3

Canon.Prep-Marr.(M-3 (MO333)

Credits:3

Social Justice (M-5) (MO334)

Credits:3

Recent Am. Conflicts5 (MO335)

Credits:3

Ethics of Soc. Comm. (MO336)

Credits:3

Grnds. Null. Marr. (M-3) (MO337)

Credits:3

Moral Values-Cont. Soc. (MO339)

Credits:2

Pol.& Moral Soc.Issu (MO340)

Credits:3

Prep. of Briefs -M-3 (MO341)

Credits:3

Psy.-Moral Understnd (MO342)

Credits:2

Rural Culture & Spirituality (MO355)

Credits:3

Spiritual Direction I (Sp) (MO356)

Credits:3

Spiritual Direction II (Sp) (MO358)

Credits:3

Ethical Life Issues (MO359)

Credits:3

Par. Administration (MO362)

Credits:3

Reconciliation- Directed Readings (MO370)

Credits:3

Liturgy of Hrs.-Sp (MO380)

Credits:3

Teilhard de Chardin (MO381)

Credits:3

The Rage of Nations (MO382)

Credits:2

Liturgical Spirituality-Sp (MO393)

Credits:2

Outside Course (MO399)

Credits:2

Ethical Issues-Prsth (MO400)

Credits:2

Sp. by Way-Autobio(Sp) (MO405)

Credits:3

Int. & Catastrophe (Sp) (MO408)

Credits:2

Mary & Saints (Sp) (MO412)

Credits:3

The Mystical Journey (MO416)

Credits:4

Readings in Moral Theology (M-1) (MO420)

Credits:2

Am Cath Spirituality (MO434)

Credits:0

NCTI-Prayer-Life Sp. (MO454)

Credits:3

Teach. Assistant (MO509)

Credits:2

Ind. Study Psyc. Issue (MS200)

Credits:2

Music & Min.-Worship (MS211)

Credits:3

Homiletics I (MS212)

Credits:3

Psychological Issues (MS213)

Credits:2

Homiletics II (MS214)

Credits:3

Eucharistic Celeb. (MS215)

Credits:3

Lit.Min.Hispanics I (MS219)

Credits:3

Lit.Min.Hispanics II (MS220)

Credits:3

Poverty of Spirit (MS300)

Credits:3

You Can't Say in Ch (MS305)

Credits:3

Theo/His.Hispanic Mi (MS320)

Credits:3

Intro Min. Hisp. Comm. (MS323)

Credits:3

Current Issues-Hisp. (MS324)

Credits:0

Liturgical Music (MS325)

Credits:0

Ritual Expression (MS326)

Credits:0

Evang. Inculturation (MS330)

Credits:3

All in the Family (MS335)

Credits:1

Poverty of Spirit (MS336)

Credits:0

Liturgical Issues (MS361)

Credits:0

Comfort in Hope (MS369)

Credits:0

Vocal Practicum I (MS370)

Credits:0

Choral Music (Choir) (MS372)

Credits:0

Issues in Liturgical Music (MS374)

Credits:0

Vocal Practicum II (MS380)

Credits:0

Liturgical Ministers (MS381)

Credits:2

Cross Cultural Min. (MS392)

Credits:2

Preaching (MS399)

Credits:1

Drtd Rdgs of Bl. Marmion (MT501)

Credits:2

Edith Stein (MT502)

Credits:2

Virtue Theory (MT508)

Credits:1

Reconciliation Pract/Sprtl Direction (MT510)

Credits:2

Fundamental Moral Theology (MT512)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to Catholic moral theology. Scripture, Apostolic Tradition, various ecclesial traditions, and natural reason are studied in light of moral decision-making. Christ is the paradigm of human action. The believer is challenged to live the faith. Virtue as a path to holiness is discussed along with fundamental concepts including: natural law, sin, double effect, scandal, material cooperation with evil, and action theory (the role of intention and the moral object in voluntary human acts).

Moral Theology (MT513)

Credits:2

Medical Ethics/Suffering (MT514)

Credits:3

Sexuality & Vocation (MT516)

Credits:3

This course examines sexuality, marriage, and family from the perspective of Catholic morality. God’s nature as Trinitarian love, the person as imago dei, the intrinsic goodness of the human body (attested to by both Incarnation and Resurrection), the human vocation as self-gift, the grace of baptism, and marriage as an indissoluble spiritual sign of the union between Christ and his church, all instantiate the redemptive possibility of sex as a true language of love. At the same time, the wounds of original sin, the dividedness of the human will, and various “structures of sin” pervading modern culture instantiate the possible misuse of sex to objectify, degrade, and abuse both self and others. After clarifying the Church’s understanding of the problem and her recommended solutions, students in the course will participate in mock practice conversations with parishioners on the following topics: marriage and family life, adultery, fornication, homosexual acts, pornography, masturbation, contraception, and natural family planning.

Social Doctrine of the Church (MT517)

Credits:3

This course explores the dignity of the human person and its practical implications for human life in society. Topics to be discussed include: human rights and corresponding duties; political responsibility and the common good; the principles of subsidiarity and solidarity; and the issues of migration, racism and anti-Semitism, war and peace, capital punishment, poverty and wealth, private property and the free market, and international development.

Reconciliation Practicum (MT519)

Credits:2

The course is meant to give the soon-to-be priest some practical experiences of the Sacrament of Penance and or spiritual direction. Seminarians should deepen their understanding of their role as confessors and spiritual directors as well the significance of these ministries. Moreover, seminarians will become aware of the methods of prayer, what the Tradition has to offer for those seeking to understand the movement of God in their life as well as acquire the ability to listen to people from the Heart of Christ.

Special Issues in Moral Theology (MT522)

Credits:2

Medical Ethics (MT525)

Credits:3

Rdgs-Spiritual Theology (MT530)

Credits:3

Spirit Dioc. Priest (MT599)

Credits:2

Catholic Social Thought (MT605)

Credits:2

Readings in Moral Theology (MT606)

Credits:2

Splendor of Truth (MT609)

Credits:2

Fathers & Mothers of the Desert (MT616)

Credits:2

This course will examine the rise of Christian monasticism in the fourth and fifth centuries. We will consider the historical context of monasticism, examine its theological content primarily through contemporary writings, and assess its impact on the Church’s life and spirituality.

Christian Marriage (MT618)

Credits:2

Special Topics (MT620)

Credits:2

The Holy Sacrifice of the Mass (MT621)

Credits:2

The Spiritual Exercises of St. Ignatius of Loyola (MT622)

Credits:2

Theological Themes in Literature (MT625)

Credits:2

The Economic Encyclicals (MT626)

Credits:2

Splendor Veritatis: The Splendor of Truth (MT627)

Credits:2

Human Suffering and Redemption (MT628)

Credits:2

Friendship & Moral Life (MT633)

Credits:2

Friendship seems so important to us that it’s hard to image a fulfilling life without it. Friendship also occupies a prominent role in the Christian Revelation. In the Gospel of John, for instance, Jesus says: “No longer do I call you slaves, for the slave does not know what his master is doing; but I have called you friends, for all things that I have heard from My Father I have made known to you” (John 15:15). Even though, friendship is so important, most likely, few of us have seriously thought about the nature of friendship. In this course, we will try to remedy this lacuna by investigate the nature of friendship and its relation the ideal of good life. We will ask whether friends are essential components of our happiness or mere means to it. Furthermore, we will ask whether friendship hinders or promotes the aims of morality. In doing so, we will examine the works of historical and contemporary philosophers.

Word of God & Liturgy (MT635)

Credits:2

Human Person in the Thght of Edith Stein (MT636)

Credits:2

This course examines the intellectual life and writings of Edith Stein especially her analysis of human personhood. In Stein’s construction of theological anthropology the Aquinasian metaphysics and Husserlian phenomenology come together. Stein brings these two intellectual and spiritual giants together in a deeply engaging and constructive dialogue towards understanding the human person for a post-modern age, where widespread materialism, consumerism, secularism, and technocracy rule.

Spec. Topics in Christian Life & Thgt (MT637)

Credits:2

Medical Ethics/Human Suffering (MT640)

Credits:3

Christian Meaning of Human Suffer. (MT643)

Credits:2

Human suffering has long been part and parcel of the human condition. It has been commonly accepted without any rationale. This course will seek a rationale for human suffering. It will look for a spiritual meaning in the documents of the Magisterium.

Gospel of Life (MT644)

Credits:2

Balthazar Biblical Spirituality (MT660)

Credits:3

Christian Meaning of Human Suffering (MT663)

Credits:2

Evangelium Vitae: The Gospel of Life (MT690)

Credits:2

With abortion, embryonic stem cell research, and capital punishment part and parcel of modern day culture, the value of human life is certainly not understood. Saint John Paul II realized this and wrote his encyclical, The Gospel of Life. In this encyclical the Pope is highly critical of society’s lack of respect for human life. He writes that a culture of death prevails. In this course we will analyze the Pope’s document as he contrasts society’s values with the gospel of life.

Christian Marriage (MT691)

Credits:2

Social Justice & Virtue Theory (MT692)

Credits:2

Gospel of Life (MT693)

Credits:0

Question of Natural Law (MT695)

Credits:3

The Spanish Spiritual Doctors (MT833)

Credits:3

Admission & Scrutinies Board - Candidate Path (PF104)

Credits:0.067

Admission & Scrutinies Board - Ordination Path (PF105)

Credits:0.067

Ordination Preparation Meeting (PF107)

Credits:2

Convocation (PF108)

Credits:0.1

Art-Spiritual Direction (PF201)

Credits:5

Christian Prayer & Virtue (PF501)

Credits:2

Human & Spiritual Foundation (PF502)

Credits:3

Spirituality of Diocesan Prsthd (PF503)

Credits:2

Mystery of Liturgy (PF504)

Credits:2

Contemporary Philosophy I (PH200)

Credits:3

Pastoral Intern. Qtr (PI211)

Credits:2

Theological Reflection (PI212)

Credits:2

Clinical Past. Ed. (PI213)

Credits:2

Presiding at Rites (PI214)

Credits:2

Pastoral Min. Pract. (PI216)

Credits:0

Cross Curtural Ministry (PI300)

Credits:3

Min. Hear. Impaired (PI308)

Credits:3

Rural Ministry & Rural Pas (PI337)

Credits:3

Rural Culture & Sprituality (PI338)

Credits:3

Parish Evang.-Future (PI364)

Credits:3

Marr.& Family Issues (PI369)

Credits:3

Par. Administration (PI370)

Credits:3

Intro to Catechesis (PI376)

Credits:3

New Evangelization (PI385)

Credits:3

Intro to Hisp. Min. (PI386)

Credits:3

Background-Hisp.Min. (PI387)

Credits:3

Background-PolishMin (PI388)

Credits:3

Min.Culture-Other (PI391)

Credits:3

Cross Cultural Min. (PI392)

Credits:0

Background-Black Min (PI393)

Credits:9

Evangelization,Incul (PI394)

Credits:1

Issues-Pastoral Adm. (PI399)

Credits:2

Sp of Min. with Poor (PI400)

Credits:3.5

Current Issues -Hisp (PI441)

Credits:3

Pastoral Counseling-Hispanic (PL338)

Credits:3

Evangelization (PL364)

Credits:3

Catechesis (PL376)

Credits:2

Hisp. Youth Ministry (PL380)

Credits:2

U.S. Hisp.Theologies (PL381)

Credits:2

Evangelization, Inculturation, & Hisp. (PL394)

Credits:0

Pastoral Year (PL519)

Credits:9

Service to Charity Field Education (PT501)

Credits:0.8

Service to Word Field Education (PT502)

Credits:1.67

Service to Liturgy Internship (PT503)

Credits:0

Theological Reflection III (PT510)

Credits:2

Theol. Reflection on Catechesis & Family (PT511)

Credits:1

Pastoral Care & Counseling (PT512)

Credits:1

This course is designed to be a preparation for the pastoral internship. Pastoral care in a variety of settings will be explored, including marriage and family, grief and bereavement, brief encounter, and crisis. In addition, the course will focus on the development and practice of the basic pastoral care skills of attending, listening, and empathy. Intercultural competency is also addressed and practiced. Attention to data and to personal assumptions is an additional focus.

Theol. Reflect.II-Ministry Preparation (PT513)

Credits:1

Pastoral Internship (PT514)

Credits:9

The pastoral internship usually takes place during the spring semester of second year. Dioceses may extend it for an entire year.  Primary areas of ministerial involvement are education, pastoral care, prayer and liturgy, preaching, and adult faith life. This is a supervised, parish-based experience and ordinarily takes place in the home diocese.

Theological Reflection III (PT515)

Credits:2

Parish Skills (PT516)

Credits:2

Clinical Pastoral Education (PT517)

Credits:3

C.P.E. takes place in the summer following Second Theology and pastoral internship. In this full-time chaplaincy internship, the student puts into practice the theological knowledge and pastoral skills he has acquired. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating abilities to clearly articulate the faith, to attend pastorally to others, to work in team relationships, and to seek and receive feedback. This experience is usually in a hospital in an ecumenical setting.

Pastoral Leadership (PT518)

Credits:1

This course completes the Pastoral Theology sequence and prepares the seminarian for successful post-ordination learning during his associateship. We focus on the role of the pastor as preacher/teacher, counselor, presider, liaison for social services, and administrator. How does a pastor fashion a gospel vision and implement it in all aspects of parish life? We will look at leadership styles and how those styles are manifested in a parish setting and their impact on the parish community. Issues include prayer and liturgy, education, outreach and evangelization, business and finance, generational ministerial issues, stewardship, personnel decisions, planning, follow-up, evaluation, pastoring multiple and diverse parishes, pastoring in urban and rural settings, etc. Input from outside sources is obtained, and feedback from lived experience is explored.

Pastoral Year (PT519)

Credits:9

TTPP Integration (PT520)

Credits:1

Advanced Pastoral Care and Counseling (PT520)

Credits:2

Teaching Parish II (PT521)

Credits:3

Intro to Pastoral Theology (PT522)

Credits:1

This course introduces students to pastoral and practical theology for ministry and takes as its basic task the promotion of faithful discipleship and the preparation of seminarians for pastoral ministry. Since pastoral theology focuses on responding to concrete situations, this course emphasizes practical theology and the ability to reflect theologically on pastoral experiences. Seminarians are encouraged to develop a lifelong practice of interpreting lived experiences in the light of Scripture, Church teaching, personal faith, culture and pastoral practices. The focus of this course flows from the Teaching Parish Program and the involvement of seminarians in their assigned parish.

Pastoral Theology (PT523)

Credits:1

One part of the course covers a number of topics related to reflective ministry, including the Cyber Challenge, the neighborhood, the “American Protestant culture context,” “the poor,” advanced intercultural competencies, collaboration, “Bowling Alone”. Another part of the course is a learning review of certain events/encounters described from the internship. This takes place in a small group of peers with a faculty member. In addition, one’s “operative theology” is explored. (This is a term for what one’s life as a minister “says” (manifests) about God, Jesus, Church, sin and grace, ministry.) A third aspect of the course is the presenting of Teaching Parish Captures, illuminating them with situational analysis and perspectives drawn from other courses taken, leading to insights (what strikes one), reactions, feelings, and then further insights.

The Catholic and Contemporary U.S. Immigration (PT524)

Credits:2

Evang., Mission & Culture (PT525)

Credits:3

Global Mission and Intercultural Competencies (PT526)

Credits:2

This course prepares soon-to-be priests to meet the challenges related to the evangelizing mission in today’s changing pastoral contexts. Three contemporary challenges for pastoral ministers are identified: 1) presenting, or representing, to 21-century societies God’s revelation and faith in Jesus Christ, 2) life in a global village and its implications, and 3) ministering in culturally and religiously diverse parishes. Keeping on God’s mission today requires pastoral ministers to be prepared and competent in meeting these challenges.

Canon Law I (PT527)

Credits:2

This course will provide future Pastors and Associate Pastors with the canonical norms that structure the organization of the Catholic Church. The purpose of this class is to provide a general introduction to the Code of Canon Law of the Latin (Roman) Church and to the manner in which law functions in service to the People of God.

Canon Law II (PT528)

Credits:2

This course will provide future Pastors and Associate Pastors with the canonical norms that structure the approach of the Roman Catholic Church to the Sacraments and Sacramentals. The purpose of this class is to provide a general introduction to some of the issues that they will encounter in the prayer of the Roman (Latin rite) Catholic Church.

Canon Law (PT529)

Credits:2

Theological Reflection I, II, III (PT535)

Credits:2

Pastoral Care & Counseling (PT540)

Credits:2

Theol. Resources for Preaching (PT554)

Credits:2

Pastoral Theology (PT590)

Credits:2

Missiology (PT591)

Credits:3

Independent Study (PT610)

Credits:2

Canonical Prep.-Marriage (PT633)

Credits:2

This course addresses various canonical and pastoral problems which the minister faces in preparing couples for marriage. The canonical forms of each diocese are explained, and various pastoral approaches used in instructing engaged couples will be analyzed.  (3rd and 4th Year only)

Leading Faith Communities Through Change (PT637)

Credits:2

Gospel of Life (PT644)

Credits:2

Theol. Resources for Preaching (PT654)

Credits:0

Advanced Evang. & Catechesis (PT676)

Credits:2

Pastoring Multiple/Diverse Parishes (PT678)

Credits:2

Adv. Pastoring Muliple Parishes (PT679)

Credits:2

Comprehensive Exam (RS001)

Credits:0

Intro to OT (RS200)

Credits:2

STL Spanish Language Exam (SPLEXAM)

Credits:0

Spirituality (ST500)

Credits:0

Spiritual Direction (ST515)

Credits:2

Special Topics in Spiritual Direction (ST516)

Credits:2

Spiritual Theology (ST517)

Credits:3

Eastern Christian Spirituality (ST520)

Credits:2

This elective course will be held as an independent study course with three scheduled meetings to be held with the professor during the semester. Times will be scheduled in advance with the professor to meet: once during the first week of class; second meeting to be held mid semester at pre-arranged time, and the concluding meeting with final paper to be handed in during the last week of class. All dates will be set at the initial meeting prior at the start of the semester.

Race, Racism, & Christian ID & Ministry (ST521)

Credits:2

This course examines critically the concept of human races and sociocultural practices that express and reproduce racism in various forms (e.g., cultural, psychological, interpersonal, institutional), in order to address them constructively, in light of normative standards of reference: human nature and personal and group identities within a fully Christian worldview. Students will engage several historical, biological, philosophical, social scientific, legal, and biblical and theological treatments pertaining to “race” (and ethnicity) to clarify how contemporary life has come to be organized and interpreted by commonsense racial reasoning, both in the Church and in wider society. We will focus on (1) learning how to recognize and analyze past and present instantiations of the use of race as an ordering principle and a racialized outlook in the Church and in the wider society, and (2) evaluating those aspects that are more and less commensurate with the objectively good patterns of personal and communal self-understanding and ways of living, as presented in (a) the biblical account of redemptive history, culminating in eschatological reality in Christ, and (b) Catholic social teaching, including the USCCB Pastoral Letter, “Open Wide Our Hearts” (November 2018) and treatments of race by Catholic theologians (e.g., Fr. Brian Massingale). The goal is to equip students to develop evidence-based, critical, nuanced analyses of inherited, common-sense assumptions and truth-claims about race (held by Christians and non-Christians alike) in the contexts in which they live, in order to bring authentically Christian, Scripturally-directed patterns of analysis, a faithful voice, and appropriate actions to bear in proclaiming, embodying, and implementing the good news of the kingdom of God in their respective spheres of influence.

Analysis and Critique of Contemporary Secular Thought on Gender and Identity Politics I (ST522)

Credits:1

This course is designed to challenge students to be conscientious intellectual explorers who thoroughly and honestly engage thoughts and ideas prior to developing an option or coming to a conclusion. The course will utilize the current cultural discussion surrounding gender and identity politics to elicit the students’ theoretical, doctrinal and psychological response to the opposing arguments. Students will engage contemporary media channels such as You Tube, popular podcasts and blogs that feature differing viewpoints on issues of gender and identity politics in order to develop the capacity to make correct distinctions, practice effective communication, identify personal preferences and prejudices and generally cultivate the habit of honest engagement with potential interlockers which seeks truth rather than victory.

Analysis and Critique of Contemporary Secular Thought on Gender and Identity Politics II (ST524)

Credits:2

Spititual Classics (ST525)

Credits:2

Analysis and Critique of Contemporary Secular Thought on Gender and Identity Politics III (ST526)

Credits:2

Pneumatology: Experience of the Holy Spirit (ST604)

Credits:2

Word of God & Liturgy (ST635)

Credits:2

NCTI - Seven Deadly Sins (ST654)

Credits:2

NCTI: Difficult Isssues in Pastoral Care (ST655)

Credits:2

The attractive power of religion can be discovered in many ways.  The course will examine Beauty as found in church music, sacred art, architecture, iconography, prose and poetry, preaching and literature.

NCTI: Dogmatic and Spiritual Theology (ST656)

Credits:2

NCTI: Global Theologies (ST657)

Credits:2

Globalization and a greatly expanded encounter of communities and cultures pose new questions to theology. This course on Global Theologies surveys contemporary challenges to Christology, anthropology, pneumatology and other topics, with special attention to apologetics, evangelism, and ecumenism.

Theology of Holy Spirit (SY305)

Credits:3

Images of God (SY306)

Credits:0

Christ. Beyond Chalcd (SY310)

Credits:3

Themes in Pat. Theo. (SY311)

Credits:0

St. Augustine: Life and Thought (SY312)

Credits:0

Ch.in PluralisticAge (SY317)

Credits:3

Catholic Theologians-C.G.Jung (SY322)

Credits:3

Ritual Expression (SY326)

Credits:3

Ecclesiology II (SY327)

Credits:3

Schism between East and West (SY355)

Credits:3

Ecumenical Dialogue (SY358)

Credits:3

Liturgical Issues (SY361)

Credits:3

The Eucharist (SY362)

Credits:3

Liturgical Celebrations (L/S) (SY363)

Credits:2

Cultural Adapt -Lit. (SY372)

Credits:3

Issues in Liturgical Music (SY374)

Credits:3

Liturgy and Social Justice (SY376)

Credits:3

Liturgical Renewal - 20th Century (SY377)

Credits:3

Liturgy of the Hours (SY380)

Credits:3

Teilhard de Chardin (SY381)

Credits:1

Christian Initiation (SY383)

Credits:1

The Cosmic Liturgy (SY384)

Credits:2

Reconciliation Received Sym (SY387)

Credits:3

Empowering the Laity (SY388)

Credits:3

Liturgical Art and Environment (SY389)

Credits:2

Issues-Past Liturgy (SY392)

Credits:3

Liturgical Spirituality (SY393)

Credits:3

Theology of Eucharist (SY396)

Credits:3

Eucharist: Sacramental Sacrifice (SY397)

Credits:3

Theology of Holy Spirit (SY401)

Credits:3

Paul Tillich's Christology (SY402)

Credits:3

Sp. by Way of Autobio (SY405)

Credits:3

Readings - Feminist Theology (SY407)

Credits:3

Christian Poets & Preachers (SY409)

Credits:3

The Other World (SY428)

Credits:1

Church as Communion (SY432)

Credits:1

Theological Methodology (SY440)

Credits:3

Cappadocians (SY446)

Credits:3

Theology-St. Augustine (SY451)

Credits:3

Christology-T.Merton (SY459)

Credits:3

Christ, the Image (SY460)

Credits:3

Jesus, Religion & Violence (SY465)

Credits:3

Scriptures-World's Religion (SY468)

Credits:3

Theo. of Ch Councils (SY477)

Credits:3

God & Cont.Theo(Can) (SY478)

Credits:3

Papal Ministry (Can) (SY481)

Credits:3

Theo.EpiscopalMin(Ca (SY482)

Credits:3

Sac. of Marriage (SY485)

Credits:3

Origin of Alexandria (SY487)

Credits:3

Thomas Merton (SY489)

Credits:0

The Christian Faith (SY490)

Credits:3

Ch. Faith-Great Lit. (SY491)

Credits:3

Professing Christ (SY492)

Credits:3

Genesis (SY493)

Credits:3

Ecumenism (STL) (SY504)

Credits:3

Theological Anthropology (SY505)

Credits:3

Meth & Systems (STL) (SY506)

Credits:3

Doc. & Methods II (STL) (SY507)

Credits:3

Counseling and Pastoral Accompaninment (WO315)

Credits:1

Liturgical Renewal - 20th Century (WO334)

Credits:3

Liturgical Spirituality (WO346)

Credits:3

Liturgical Issues (WO361)

Credits:2