Course Information

 

for Pre-Theology Department


Greek I (BH503)

Credits:3

This course consists of a careful study of the grammar and syntax of the Greek Language with emphasis on New Testament usage.

Greek II (BH504)

Credits:3

Building on Greek I, this course moves towards readings and exegesis of selected passages.

Ecclesiastical Latin (LG501)

Credits:3

Basic grammar and vocabulary.

Ecclesiastical Latin II (LG502)

Credits:3

A continuation of the study of Latin grammar syntax and vocabulary began in Latin I. Emphasis will be on reading passages of theological Latin literature.

Ethics (PH600)

Credits:3

Anthropology (PH601)

Credits:3

This course introduces the student to philosophy through an examination of questions about "human nature" and what it means to be "human." Related issues are: knowledge, freedom, the individual person, death, purpose and meaning. Important writers in the history of Western thought are examined to see why they come to their conclusions and to see the consequences of their thought for personal and theological reflection. In the process, students discover the nature of philosophy and its methods.

Metaphysics (PH602)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction to fundamental Thomistic metaphysics. Among the issues considered are the following: the question and grasp of Being; the language of metaphysics; the structure of finite being; the nature and role of causality; metaphysical consideration of God, evolution, good and evil; the Thomistic understanding of the whole. Certain contemporary perspectives on the question and meaning of Being are also considered.

Natural Theology (PH603)

Credits:3

This is a course in the basic metaphysical questions concerning reality and the principles in terms of which reality can be coherently explained. It also considers the reality of God: his existence, nature, and relationship to the world; the question of evil, faith and reason. Students review both classical explanations and modern critiques. In the final analysis, Natural Theology establishes not much of the truth of God as the truth of man, of human reasons pondering the Numinous.

Ethics (PH604)

Credits:3

This course examines the ethical theories of eight influential philosophers in the Western tradition: Aristotle, Epictetus, Aquinas, Hume, Kant, Mill, Sartre, and Camus. Students will read excerpts of primary sources, along with some secondary source material. By the end of the course, students will be able to summarize and critically engage the various schools of thought typified by each philosopher. Such knowledge will prove invaluable for the historical study of theology, which developed in part as a response to these philosophical currents. It will also shed light on the diversity of moral beliefs present in our contemporary milieu, equipping future priests with the requisite knowledge to become new evangelizers in a world desperately in search of meaning.

Contemporary Philosophy (PH605)

Credits:3

An in-depth consideration of authors in contemporary philosophy and their impact on Christian thinking, with concentration on Heidegger, Marcel, Kierkegaard, as well as James, Peirce, Dewey and the Pragmatic Movement. Other issues include: the human person and his/her relationship to God, others, and the world.

Modern Philosophy (PH606)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student interested in priesthood and/or evangelization to the world that has been shaped by modern thought. Rather than study individual philosophers, we focus on the problematic and process of modern and contemporary philosophy, and on distinctions essential to understand our status as human agents. To grasp clearly the transformations of modern philosophy, we contrast it with classical thinking. It is hoped that the student will appreciate better the challenges the modern world presents to the proclamation of the Gospel.

Religion Seminar (PH607)

Credits:2

The Seminar covers a variety of issues: Reading, methods of study, writing skills and research. A study of the nature of Religion and the relationship of Faith and Reason. A study of a variety of Christian and non-Christian religious traditions.

Contemporary Philosophy (PH608)

Credits:3

Philosophy (PH609)

Credits:2

Metaphysics (PH610)

Credits:3

Research Seminar (PH611)

Credits:0

Research and writing guidance for final paper for M.A. Degree.

Medieval Philosophy (PH612)

Credits:3

A course in the History of Medieval Philosophy. This course will concentrate on the life, works and foundational principles beginning with Boethius and ending with Ockham. A concentration on the philosophical thinking of St. Thomas Aquinas.

Ancient Philosophy (PH614)

Credits:3

Covering the times from ca. 600 BC until 430 AD, the course is a survey of the Greek philosophical tradition form the Pre-Socratics to the rise of Christianity. The course will concentrate on both the history and readings/analysis of philosophical texts with the bodysoul problematique as the unifying topic. Special attention will be given to Plato, Aristotle and Augustine.

Rdgs in Phil Topics (PH615)

Credits:2

Reading Group (PH616)

Credits:0

In preparation of the comprehensive exams, students participate in a reading group directed by a faculty member. The course has the goal of insuring the orderly and timely study of philosophy reading list.

Reading Group II (PH617)

Credits:0

Logic (PH619)

Credits:3

This course is an introduction into the notions and procedures of Aristotelean formal and modern logic. However, logic cannot be properly understood without an awareness of the other two arts of the trivium, grammar and rhetoric. So we will also examine the relationship of grammar and logic; meaning; the interplay of identity/difference and presence/absence in language; and the nature and function of rhetoric.

Philosophy of Nature (PH620)

Credits:3

Humanities (PH621)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to introduce the student to some of the best works in Christian (and primarily Catholic) writers of literature. The first part of this course will concentrate on drama, the second part on poetry, prose and fiction. Both parts seek to provide examples of what great style can achieve to defend and expound the faith in many different genres, from novels and plays to autobiography and poetry. The plays chosen for this course all deal in some way with the question of the afterlife and thus demonstrate how theological truths can be conveyed through works of literary art and not just in tracts and texts of theology proper. The poetry section will concentrate on the poetry of the Jesuit poet Gerard Manley Hopkins, and the novel assigned deals with a famous fictional conversion, the narrator of the novel Brideshead Revisited.

Epistemology (PH623)

Credits:3

A study of the nature of knowledge. The various explanations of knowledge as presented throughout western thought. How we justify claims of truth. Various theories of truth. Skepticism, relativism. Faith and Knowledge.

MA Phil Exam (PH625)

Credits:0

This course will look at major political thinkers, starting with Plato and moving into the contemporary era. Then the three major notions of Rights, Justice and Freedom will be examined – all three are critical for understanding political discourse today. Finally, we will read and examine one of the Pope’s encyclical’s on Social Justice.

Social & Political Philosophy (PH630)

Credits:3

Fundamentals of Science/Foundation of Fa (PH632)

Credits:3

This course is built upon the premise that Catholic priests need to acquire a basic literacy in the fundamental questions about physical reality which contemporary scientists are engaging, and the answers they are uncovering. This course will familiarize students with several important foci of contemporary research, preparing them to understand and articulate the significance of such knowledge for their theological studies, spiritual formation, and pastoral ministry. Two foundational pillars of modern science will be studied: field theory and genetics. Additionally, the relatively new discipline of Complexity Theory will be introduced as a means for investigating the inherently relational dynamics that seem to govern the large-scale structure of both inanimate matter and living organisms. Throughout the course, students will be challenged to draw out the theological implications of the scientific methodologies and discoveries they encounter. They will also be taught methods for applying scientific epistemology to enrich the experience of Catholic spirituality (e.g., celebrating the Seven Sacraments or practicing the discernment of spirits).

Metaphysics (PH635)

Credits:3

Church & Religion (RS601)

Credits:3

This is not a course in theology. It is an exercise in negative capability. We will prepare to read theology by trying to understand what the authors have written. We will take one doctrine and see how its understanding developed over time, and try to appreciate how the doctrines of the church are the work of theology.

Intro to O.T. (RS602)

Credits:3

This course will be an introduction to the contents of the Old Testament. The history of ancient Israel will be used as a way of understanding the content and the development of the biblical books. Methods of exegesis encouraged by official church teaching will be used and introduced.

Pastoral Practicum (RS604)

Credits:0

The PTI pastoral practicum offers those who are entering the Seminary for the first time and are looking ahead to training for ordination, an introduction to ministry, a continuing realistic look at the foundation of their expressed desire to move into priestly life, and a base upon which to make decisions prudently and intelligently. The field education assignment involved the seminarian in ministerial settings outside the Seminary under the mentoring of a site supervisor and the director of seminary field education.

Pastoral Practicum II (RS605)

Credits:2

This PT I pastoral practicum offers an additional semester of pastoral practice with supervision at a designated field education site. Emphasis is placed on the emergence of an understanding of ministry and of the minister himself. Theological reflection on the pastoral experiences will be done within the context of formation sessions by the director of field education.

Intro to New Testament (RS607)

Credits:3

After some introductory classes on the origins of the New Testament, on methods of reading it, and of its roots in the Jewish Scriptures, the course will spend most of the semester on the Synoptic Gospels and Acts. Students will also do an assignment involving the study of the New Testament Epistle.

Intro. to the Spiritual Life (RS608)

Credits:2

Catechism of the Cath. Church (RS609)

Credits:3

A thorough review of the major sections of the Catholic Catechism. Discussions and presentations leading to a correct understanding of Catholic teaching and thought.

Pastoral Practicum IV (RS610)

Credits:2

Pastoral Practicum IIIB (RS611)

Credits:2

Mission Trip (RS612)

Credits:0

The weekly field education experiences of the first semester and specially designed formation sessions on social justice prepare the seminarians for their week-long mission trips that take place during the spring semester. Seminarians will participate in either a US or foreign trip that involves prolonged and meaningful contact and ministry with the poor and marginalized. Emphasis is placed on coming to know the people and their culture as well as the structures and history that have contributed to the human needs and injustice. Solidarity with others is stressed during the mission trip experiences as they come to more fully understand the Church’s call to justice and their own responsibilities to others based on the dignity of the human person and role of servants to Christ and His Church. Following the mission trips, the men participate in presenting highlights of their mission experiences to the larger seminary community.

Documents of Vatican II (RS617)

Credits:3

The Second Vatican Council from 1962-1965 is the single most important development in the Church in the Modern period. The Council is a treasury of magisterial teaching seeking both ressourcement and aggiornamento, a renewed emphasis on Biblical and Patristic teaching with an eye toward modernizing the approach of the Church as in the world but not of the world. Its wide sweeping calls for change as well as for authentic continuity with the earliest traditions of the Church make for a challenging course of study to enable the student to see and appreciate both of these poles within the Council documents and in Church teaching developed after the Council.

Intro to Theol. Reflection (RS618)

Credits:1

Philosophy of Nature (RS620)

Credits:3