Course Information

 

for STL Department


STL Comp (DT001)

Credits:0

Apologetics (DT633)

Credits:2

Drtd Rdgs- John Henry Newman (DT800)

Credits:3

Independent Study-Directed Reading (DT801)

Credits:3

Pauline Christology (DT803)

Credits:3

HCTI (DT811)

Credits:3

This course will make a close examination of the emergence and development of the Catholic Tradition in both the East and West from the New Testament to 786 AD. It will emphasize a critical reading of texts from significant authors that highlight the major themes of Christology, Trinitarian Theology and Theological Anthropology. The texts will be set in the context of the general history of the Christian Church during these centuries. There will be a particular emphasis on the disputes over Trinitarian Theology and Christology.

HCT II (DT812)

Credits:3

This course surveys the development of Catholic doctrine in from the 8th century to the 15th century, focusing on how Augustinian, Dionysian and Thomist theological paradigms functioned as the basis for the variety of theological schools and methods which formed the theological landscape of medieval Christendom.  Theological developments in the doctrine of God, Christology, and Christian anthropology will be discussed, with special emphasis on progress in understanding in the doctrines of the human person and the dynamics of salvation.

HCT III (DT813)

Credits:3

This course explores some of the major themes in the history of Christian theology from 1500 until 1900. It engages Martin Luther and John Calvin and discusses the Catholic response, especially as expressed in the Council of Trent. It presents the Age of Enlightenment as also the logical outgrowth of these religious contestations. Taking Immanuel Kant and G.W.F. Hegel as the points d’appui, it discusses next the contributions of Friedrich Schleiermacher, Johann Adam Mohler, Soren Kierkegaard, Vatican I, John Henry Newman and Matthias Scheeben

HCT IV (DT814)

Credits:3

This course will cover the issues and theologians from the period of the Modernist Crisis in 1860 through the twentieth century and the recent debates over the theology of Hans Urs von Balthasar. The integrating theme will be theology’s engagement with the intellectual currents of the Modern world.  The course will examine the emergence of  so-called “liberal theology” and trace the various reactions across the years. 

HCT V (DT815)

Credits:3

Research Seminar (DT817)

Credits:2

Theological Assistantship (DT818)

Credits:3

Thesis Proposal (DT819)

Credits:3

The goal of this course is the crafting of a S.T.L. Thesis Proposal. Topics covered will include theological method, status quaestionis, second level bibliographical sources, and theological argument. In addition, students will also meet regularly with their director.

STL Thesis Writing (DT820)

Credits:2

STL Thesis Writing (DT821)

Credits:2

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT822)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT823)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT824)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT825)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT826)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT827)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT828)

Credits:1

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT82S)

Credits:1

STL Readings Course (DT830)

Credits:3

Mystics of the Eastern Christian Tradition (DT831)

Credits:3

Trent and Vatican II (DT832)

Credits:3

Soteriology (DT833)

Credits:3

St. Thomas on Temperance (DT835)

Credits:3

Theology & Science (DT836)

Credits:3

Pauline Christology (DT837)

Credits:3

St. Paul was the Church’s first theologian, and the history of Christian theology begins with him and can never wander far from his inspiration. Paul, however, wrote letters in response to pastoral problems. He did not leave any systematic essays. Therefore, there have been many attempts to summarize his theology using many different organizing principles. Our attempt will proceed by taking “Living in Christ” as Paul’s central concept. We will try to uncover the elements of Paul’s Christology by following the thread of this theme through the Pauline corpus of thirteen letters.

The Book of Revelation (DT838)

Credits:3

This course will focus upon reading the key documents of the Councils of Trent and Vatican II.  We will inquire also into the history and theological background of these Councils, and we will take note of the way in which Vatican II receives Trent.  We will ask what the future holds for the teachings of Trent and Vatican II.  The goal of the course is to offer insight into the ways in which the Catholic Church understands divine revelation (including such major theological topics as the nature of the Church, the nature of Scripture and Tradition, the nature of the sacraments, and the Church in relation to the world) in our post-Renaissance, historically conscious, and increasingly globalized world.

Sacra. Thought & Practice in the 20th Cent. (DT839)

Credits:3

The Theology of Pope Benedict XVI (DT840)

Credits:3

Theology of Dumitru Staniloae (DT841)

Credits:3

Aquinas the Exegete & Preacher (DT842)

Credits:3

As a Dominican, a mendicant priest, and a medieval Magister in Sacra Pagina, Thomas Aquinas dedicated a significant amount of his life and ministry to interpreting the Word of God--both for university students in the classroom, as well as for wider congregations in the Liturgy. This course will acquaint students with Thomas the exegete and preacher by studying the content of his Biblical commentaries and sermons, as well as the method he followed as he moved from the sacra pagina to exegesis, and from exegesis to preaching. In the process, the picture of Thomas that emerges is the portrait of a saint and scholar who applied his knowledge to the prayerful study of the Word of God, and a priest and urban preacher who understood well the importance of Scripture study and dynamic preaching in the evangelization of society. The course will also pay particular attention to lessons that can be drawn from Thomas for preaching and evangelization today. 

Patristic Elective (DT843)

Credits:3

Christian Meaning of Human Suffering (DT844)

Credits:3

Pneumatology (DT845)

Credits:3

Pneumatology is the scientific-critical examination on the Church’s teaching on the Holy Spirit and the Spirit’s abiding presence in the Catholic Church. This course examines the biblical basis of, the Patristic and historical background to, and the past and present controversial issues in this often neglected, but critically important area of dogmatic theology, Orthodox and Protestant positions will be discussed. All this serves as a prelude to a systematic presentation of Pneumatology.

Mariology (DT846)

Credits:3

Many fundamental theological questions meet in the study of Mariology: Christology, Christian Anthropology, the Church, the questions of the Reformation. This course will review the Church’s teachings regarding Mary and will investigate how they are received in ecumenical and feminist theology.

The Genius of John Henry Newman (DT847)

Credits:3

The Theology of Balthasar (DT848)

Credits:3

Hans Urs von Balthasar was indisputably one of the greatest theologians of the twentieth century, and his influence has only increased over time.  This course focuses on von Balthasar's great trilogy, comprising 15 volumes plus an Epilogue.  Von Balthasar structured his theological trilogy around the transcendentals: the beautiful, the good, and the true.  The trilogy displays vast erudition and acquaintance with the full spectrum of biblical and theological thought over the centuries.  It also displays extraordinary theological and philosophical creativity.  Since one course cannot grasp the fullness of all the volumes of the trilogy, we will undertake a close reading of the first volume of each of the three parts of the trilogy (corresponding to the beautiful, the good, and the true).  We will also read the Epilogue.  The goal is to gain an introduction to von Balthasar's purposes and strategies in his masterwork.

The Church in St. Paul (DT849)

Credits:3

St. Augustine: City of God (DT850)

Credits:3

St. Augustine: On the Trinity (DT851)

Credits:3

Augustine is a seminal thinker for Western Christianity, and perhaps the greatest theologian who has ever lived.  This course will undertake careful readings of three of his most important works: Confessions, City of God, and De Trinitate.  We will focus on appreciating the ways in which these three works are interrelated.  At the heart of our inquiry will be Augustine's understanding of God and Christ.

Doctrine of Trinity (DT852)

Credits:3

The Cosmos & Christ (DT853)

Credits:3

Faith & Reason (DT854)

Credits:3

Natural Law in the Contemporary Moral De (DT855)

Credits:3

Biblical Psychology (DT856)

Credits:3

Aquinas on Knowing God (DT857)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to explore seven theological and philosophical paths that Aquinas offers for knowing (and loving) God. Responding to divine revelation as well as to the traces of God's presence in the created order, Aquinas follows the following seven paths: philosophical contemplation of God in his unity; theological contemplation of God the Trinity; theological and philosophical reflection on God the provident Creator; knowing God as Christ the Redeemer; knowing God through his redeemed human images; knowing God through the Eucharist; and knowing God eschatologically. We will attend to an array of texts drawn from his entire corpus, including the Summa contra gentiles, the Summa theologiae, his biblical commentaries, his commentaries on Aristotle, and his Commentary on the Sentences.

Rdg: Aquinas-Summa Contra Gentiles (DT858)

Credits:3

Medieval: Aquinas and Bonaventure (DT859)

Credits:3

Prayer and Contemplation (DT860)

Credits:3

The purpose of this course is to introduce contemporary Catholic spiritual theology, with a focus on the English-speaking world.  The course proposes that the interaction between theology and spirituality can be seen by looking at key spiritual theologians from the 1950s (Thomas Merton), the 1970s (Henri Nouwen), and the 1990s (Robert Barron).  Some attention will also be paid to more recent spiritual theologians and to the revival of spiritual theology in the 1930s.  The purpose of the course is to learn about spiritual theology with special attention to the ways in which theological currents influence spirituality.

Theological Anthropology: Special Topics (DT861)

Credits:3

Hans von Balthasar held that for theology to be profound and effective, it had to be combined with spirituality. This course explores the spirituality – theology combination in some writings of von Balthasar with the aim of discussing how he addresses spiritual and practical issues.

Augustine's De Trinitate (DT862)

Credits:3

Grace (DT863)

Credits:3

Angels and Demons: Existence and Significance (DT864)

Credits:3

JPII to Human Person and Community in the Thought of Edith Stein (DT868)

Credits:3

Ongoing Thesis Writing (DT871)

Credits:1

Theological Anthropology: Special Topics (DT891)

Credits:3

Moral Theology: Special Topics (DT892)

Credits:3

Doctoral Dissertation Proposal (DT951)

Credits:3

Dissertation Writing (DT952)

Credits:3

Ongoing Dissertation Writing (DT953)

Credits:1

Dissertation Defense (DT970)

Credits:3

Dissertation Grade (DT971)

Credits:0

STL Italian Language Exam (ITAEXAM)

Credits:0